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PC Building Tips/Advice Thread
#1
Information 
PC Building Tips/Advice Thread 

Huh The first thing you should be wanting to do when considering building a PC would be to learn what all the parts are for and what they do. So here is a little basic rundown of what the major components actually do. Huh

CPU: 


CPU stands for Central Processing Unit, its pretty much the life and soul your and PC. The CPU is responsible for executing a sequence of stored instructions called a program. This program will take inputs from an input device, process the input in some way and output the results to an output device. 





Motherboard: 

A motherboard is one of the most essential parts of a computer system. It holds together many of the crucial components of a computer, including the central processing unit (CPU), memory and connectors for input and output devices. 




RAM: 

RAM (Random Access Memory) is a type of computer memory that can be accessed randomly; that is, any byte of memory can be accessed without touching the preceding bytes. RAM is the most common type of memory found in computers and other devices, such as printers. 




PSU: 

PSU (Power Supply Unit) converts mains AC to low-voltage regulated DC power for the internal components of a computer. Modern personal computers universally use a switched-mode power supply. Some power supplies have a manual selector for input voltage, while others automatically adapt to the supply voltage. 




HDD: 

HDD (Hard Drive Disk) is a data storage device used for storing and retrieving digital information using one or more rigid ("hard") rapidly rotating disks (platters) coated with magnetic material. 




SSD: 

SSD (Solid State Disk) is a nonvolatile storage device that stores persistent data on solid-state flash memory rather than mechanical platters found in HDD drives. 




GPU: 

GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is used primarily for 3D Applications. It is a single-chip processor that creates lighting effects and transforms objects every time a 3D scene is redrawn. These are mathematically-intensive tasks, which otherwise, would put quite a strain on the CPU. Lifting this burden from the CPU frees up cycles that can be used for other jobs. 




Case

The case is pretty much the house for all of your new expensive components to sit. These can vary for small mITX cases to huge cases for people with too much money and a ton of radiators. But they come in all shapes, sizes and colors to suit each and every one of your needs.


So What Is Recommended?

Well, for the typical home PC a simple dual core CPU with 4GB of RAM an 500GB HDD space will suffice for many users, it will handle tasks such as internet browsing, word processing and browser based gaming with ease. But over time it may become sluggish without the proper care and attention needed to keep your PC running smoothly. 



For PCs which you plan on gaming on is entirely down to your budget. Components for gaming on PC has such a vast price range with literally hundreds of options to choose from. So when looking for components for your new gaming PC its always best to either ask a member that you deem trustworthy on TheTechGame or simply search Google for your best options. However if you are not sure what to search for its probably best to make a post in the PC Building section asking what would be best for you. 



There are so many factors and things you should take into consideration when buying components for a PC so Im not going to bore you and list them all, however I will say though, it would be advised that you seek help/advice from one of the members here to make sure you are getting the best bang for your buck so to speak. 


FAQ

Q: Is it easy to build a PC? 
A: Its hard to say if its easy or not as different people learn at different paces, but once you have followed some guides and have a fairly good idea what to do. yes it is fairly easy. 

Q: Is it better to get a pre-build? 
A: In short? No. Stay as far away from them as you can. They use very cheap parts while using clever marketing to get people to buy them. Pre-builds will always be dearer than buying singular components so my advice to you is to always build a PC if possible. 

Q: I dont know what I want 

A: Make a post. There are many members here that give advice daily and will get you the best or the best for your budget. make sure to research the build you want before buying to make sure 100% its what you want. 

Q: Do I need to Overclock 
A: No, you do not need to at all, its a luxury some people pay extra for. Some CPUs/GPUs come with locked and unlocked variants. But the price difference can only be justified by you, the person buying it. Does it benefit you? Yes. But its up to you to decide if its worth it. 
[-] The following 2 users Like Owl 's post:
  • Kerry, run SPOT run
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#2
(12-11-2017, 11:01 PM)Owl Wrote:
So What Is Recommended?

Well, for the typical home PC a simple dual core CPU with 4GB of RAM an 500GB HDD space will suffice for many users, it will handle tasks such as internet browsing, word processing and browser based gaming with ease. But over time it may become sluggish without the proper care and attention needed to keep your PC running smoothly.

A spinning hard drive is such a bottleneck. It’s better to use a solid state drive whenever possible unless you really need the space or the budget is incredibly tight.

(12-11-2017, 11:01 PM)Owl Wrote:
Q: Is it better to get a pre-build?
A: In short? No. Stay as far away from them as you can. They use very cheap parts while using clever marketing to get people to buy them. Pre-builds will always be dearer than buying singular components so my advice to you is to always build a PC if possible.

This is a question that tech enthusiasts have and will continue to debate.


Still, it’s the right month to find and buy components!

Here are a few websites I use for finding deals in the US and maybe Canada.

Build a PC Sales - subreddit
https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapcsales/

PCPartPicker - Price Drops Last 24 Hours
https://pcpartpicker.com/products/pricedrop/



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[-] The following 3 users Like Shadow Fox's post:
  • Kerry, run SPOT run , Sora
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#3
Half of agar.ios population don't under stand this.
But I do :3


I've got ay computer, built. It's cheaper I found and it's designed to be upgradable. It's useful for intense gaming and such. I saved $300AUD by building. Do it, it's easy. Like lego, attach the parts together and save a $300 for extra accessories, programs, what ever!

My advice:

Looking at professional gaming, get a PC recommended a gtx940 and up that is a desktop. Desktops are known to be upgradable and will save you many money as you upgrade graphics card, cores, what ever. Gaming Laptops can be good but they are outdated easily. They will dominate specs for 1 year and die off outdation. 

Microphones are used to speak to others in some games, I recommend headsets because if your room isn't that big like mine, a pole with a microphone taking a 4th of the room ain't help.

Monitors do not help any specs but may help general gameplay. I know a lot with triple screens but honestly, it's not required. With 1 screen that ain't a microwave, it's decent. Get those ASUS moniters. I'm sure they are good.

Accessories are nice but... I don't have a fancy mouse or keyboard, I ain't care because they both type or click. Like, there is a keyboard form $500 AUD, damn boy, I got a black Microsoft mouse that lasted me for 3 years and it is great. The only reason keyboards or mouses can cost a lot because I know most of them come with additional buttons or such for teamspeak or anything else.

Didn't realise I wrote that long...

My advice :3
~ Valence ~

- also known as Kerry Big Grin
[-] The following 2 users Like Kerry's post:
  • Sora, Squirrel
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#4
(12-17-2017, 12:57 PM)Kerry Wrote: Half of agar.ios population don't under stand this.
But I do :3


I've got ay computer, built. It's cheaper I found and it's designed to be upgradable. It's useful for intense gaming and such. I saved $300AUD by building. Do it, it's easy. Like lego, attach the parts together and save a $300 for extra accessories, programs, what ever!

My advice:

Looking at professional gaming, get a PC recommended a gtx940 and up that is a desktop. Desktops are known to be upgradable and will save you many money as you upgrade graphics card, cores, what ever. Gaming Laptops can be good but they are outdated easily. They will dominate specs for 1 year and die off outdation. 

Microphones are used to speak to others in some games, I recommend headsets because if your room isn't that big like mine, a pole with a microphone taking a 4th of the room ain't help.

Monitors do not help any specs but may help general gameplay. I know a lot with triple screens but honestly, it's not required. With 1 screen that ain't a microwave, it's decent. Get those ASUS moniters. I'm sure they are good.

Accessories are nice but... I don't have a fancy mouse or keyboard, I ain't care because they both type or click. Like, there is a keyboard form $500 AUD, damn boy, I got a black Microsoft mouse that lasted me for 3 years and it is great. The only reason keyboards or mouses can cost a lot because I know most of them come with additional buttons or such for teamspeak or anything else.

Didn't realise I wrote that long...

My advice :3

I Agree
Reply


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